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Poppy Cummins

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Reply with quote  #61 
Howdy Tyke. Yes you can say. I have no animosity toward "the other forum" I just became put off with the blatant use of hot links selling tackle by non sponsors when that had been a no no for the whole existence of the other forum and it's Mothership ISC.
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Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
Jason Bates

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Reply with quote  #62 
  I guess I can share a bit of my own beginnings here, hopefully I won't bore anyone too much in the process as I will likely get way too wordy.  You have been warned:

I was born and raised in Eugene, Or.  My Grandfather was responsible for my first fishing experience; I was probably 8 or 9 at the time when he was aghast to hear that my Dad had not yet taken me fishing!  Off to the lake the very next day, you guessed it: worms and bobbers and my Grandmother made a delicious pan fried trout dinner that night.  It was fun, though sitting at a lake and staring at a bobber didn't hold my interest long, nor was my Dad much into that kind of fishing so it was mostly tossing spinners in the streams around Eugene for me and him over the next few years.

  On the Mckenzie river fly fishing was a common sight, and I was very curious, but my Dad did his best to dissuade me from that with comments like "yeah, you don't really catch a lot of fish that way" "it's more of an artistic thing, more about casting that actually fishing"  "kind of an elitist thing, a status thing"  etc.  But when we had an activities day in Middle School one day and fly casting was one of the offerings I took it, and right away enjoyed it.  Thought I was pretty decent at lawn casting too.  One day while buying some tackle at the sporting goods store I saw a $20 fly rod/reel/line kit and spent my own $15 on it, while promising to work off the $5 I had to borrow from my Dad (battling blackberry bushes).

Although my Dad thought I was nuts, "a fool and his money are soon parted" I think was his final comment as he handed over a $5 bill; I just had to have it!  I still needed some flies and the sporting goods store had none, so I worked a bunch more and saved up some $$$ to go visit the local fly shop, which was thankfully within walking distance.  The folks at Caddis Fly Shop were very good to me, and provided me some help in picking out some flies, and some other do dads that I would need.  That took a lot of blackberry clearing to pay for my meager fly selection, but our very first evening out on the Mckenzie I had a field day with a #12 "Mckenzie Special" (I think).  The little planters just couldn't resist, and I had more fun in that hour of fishing than all of our other days on the water combined.  Even finally managed to get my Dad to take my rod and have a go at it, it didn't take long before my Dad got into it and bought all the high end rods and stuff.  Still tease him about all that to this day, though it's funny how his memory has changed over the years.

I can't say I ever really got any good at fly fishing as a kid, but we had some pretty easy fisheries to keep me entertained anyways.  I kind of moved away from fishing altogether as I hit my mid teens, and pretty much quite entirely by my late teens to chase another lifestyle and goal.  Became a pro kayaker, travelled and competed all over for several years and immersed myself ever deeper into rivers and their canyons.  Met my wife Kayaking, and we traveled the world exploring rivers, eventually settling (a little) in Northern California near the south fork of the American river.  My love of water, especially flowing waters has been the singular strongest driving force throughout all my growing up, and traveling and changing (a gross understatement!).

Didn't fish for probably 25 years or so, when at my wife's suggestion we bought a cheap spinning rod to take on a backpacking trip in the high sierras.  We both had fun, and I mentioned that if she enjoyed that, then we really, REALLY should get a fly rod for the next trip.  Almost instantly I was "hooked" again, and my wife was too.   A few years down the road, and lots and lots of trout fishing later we took a trip to fish with my Dad in Alaska.  He had been spending most of his summers up there for over 20 years and was thrilled to have the opportunity to share that with me, since I had come back around to fishing again.  Fly fishing for silver salmon was addictive to a whole other level, and one magical evening I caught an incidental steelhead just in from the sea.  I'll never forget that evening with my Dad out on the beach at sunset, nor that wild and crazy encounter with probably the hottest fish I've ever met.  Coming home I knew I had to fish more for steelhead, and promptly ended up buying my first 2 hand rod.  The journey has only deepened, and I'm always equally curious and eager to see just what comes up around the next bend.
JB
Rheinhart Nutto

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Reply with quote  #63 
Hi every one, I was born and raised in New Jersey , I started fishing when I was three , tying flies when I was five , I got serious about it in my 20's. I moved to Oregon in 2006 , and got into two hand rods not long after. I have fished many of Oregon, and Washingtons Rivers , I have moved back east ( not by choice ) I fish the Salmon river in NY and in the catskills now. Kind of nice to be back chasing tricky trout I love the challenge. 
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Bob Rodgers

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Reply with quote  #64 

Born in South Carolina and was introduced at a very early age to fishing by way of farm ponds and bluegills. I was immediately and hopelessly addicted.
Ended up out west, in Reno years later. Fly fished (rather poorly in hindsight) the Truckee, Lake Pyramid, and every alpine stream or lake we could get to. Eventually ended up in Florence, OR since I wanted fish measured in pounds instead of inches Opened a tiny-TINYflyshop consisting mostly of materials and salmon and steelhead flies, all tied in-house. Found a tremendous shad run on the Siuslaw River virtually untouched by flyfishers. Did some guiding.
 
Got bit by the saltwater flyfishing bug....badly. Moved to South Padre, Texas, learned to run and pole a shallow water skiff and started guiding for redfish and sea trout. Got a job offer from a Texas madman to go into Mexico and open a fishing lodge. We’d target tarpon and snook in lakes connected underground (Cenotes) to the ocean that had never been fished. The fishing was incredible but the madman was more than we could handle. Back in Texas, was hired to run a bonefish lodge in Belize. Proving beyond any doubt we were slow learners, we took that job on. The hospitality business sucked, but the fishing was good, very good.
 
Took what I had learned about bonefish, tarpon, and permit and headed for the Keys. Guided down there until sun exposure, injury and age drove me out of the business. Had made a couple of trips to Arkansas over the years to gather material for some magazine articles we were assigned and ended up moving here and starting a new career. 

I resumed a passion for 1911 pistols that I developed during service in the Marine Corps and started a business customizing them. Left fishing completely for about 8 years to devote myself to the new business. My wife, in an attempt to get me out of the shop, suggested a steelhead trip back out west. We went to the CW (her dad was born in Ahsahka in 1907) and I was again doomed. Got a 2h rod, then another, then...as I said, doomed.
 
Looking back on my life, I realize I never had a real job. It’s been a hell of a ride, though.[smile]

UPDATE:
After several long, hard visits to Idaho from Arkansas, and after our little Jack Russell contacted diabetes, making a hard trip even more difficult, we decided to put our place in Arkansas on the market. It took just short of forever, but it sold this Fall and we loaded (with the help of the best friends anywhere) our household and a complete pistolsmithing shop and moved the whole mess to a little home we bought in Orofino. I’m almost done turning the garage into a workable shop, and have a busy pistolsmithing class schedule on the calendar for 2015, starting in February and ending in July.
And no, it’s not by chance that I’ll finish my work in time for Fall fishing and hunting.[biggrin]
 
Any of you guys who are in the area are welcome to stop by for a river break. We're directly across the river from the hatchery. You can find me through my website or send me a private message here.

Bob
rodgerspistolsmithing.com
Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #65 
Very cool Bob!
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Dave E. Hall

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Reply with quote  #66 
Greetings to you all I grew up in Boulder Colorado 3rd generation. I learned to fly fish when I was 7 my Dad would show the little tricks that you needed to catch those Trout in Colorado. Started tying around 12 or 13 used to watch the Bsitter ty production dry flies for Hank Roberts in Boulder. I didn't really get serous until college I would pass the late hours tying all the flies I needed for a high Mountain Lake or Creek adventure.
I spent most of my life working for the US-Forest Service in Colorado, California(1974-79) & Idaho not much time for a lot of fishing back then. Worked as Smokejumper(1980-84) in McCall Idaho retired as Fire Fighter in 2007 on the McCall Ranger District(1985-07), 32 years for the fire fighter career.
I started two hand casting in the mid 90's with a St Croix Imperial 14'-9 rod. I like to cast Burkies with Hardy reels.
I'll take my Dog (Aspen) fishing every time I hit the Rivers & Lakes around Idaho. So if you see a dude wading waving a stick with a big white dog by his side that would be me.  I also like to ty at the Fly Fishing expo's here in Idaho. I 'm always learning something new from all the people, and places I visit. Cheers to you all,and have good New Year, Dave

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fredaevans

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Reply with quote  #67 
St. Boniface, Manitoba, then to Ocean Falls, BC. Was interesting to walk across the US boarder with our new 'Green Cards' in hand. Sitting at the Grey Hound Bus Stop-bench, Blaine, Washington, eating our sandwich. Boarder Patrol Agent checked us out: Mom: "How rude of you, sit, I have an extra sandwich." He sat.
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Steve Baguley

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Reply with quote  #68 
Hello & greetings to all, born and raised in Greater Toronto Area. I fish the tributaries of Lake Ontario, Erie and Huron. I'm an avid fly tier, fly fisher and custom rod builder.


Steve.
Dan Cahill

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Reply with quote  #69 
I grew up in same town where Bruce lives. I fished the Columbia as a youth and long before I learned anything about fly fishing. Work opportunities took me and family to the Lower Mainland in BC. I live in New Westminster.

I am always involved in conservation and protection of fish habitat. I belong to the Totem Flyfishers, Osprey Fly Fishers, Past President of the BCFFF and am currently a director of the Steelhead Society of BC. I want to thank any of you who have supported our projects and initiatives over the years.

I don't post very much but I enjoy reading the forum and pay close attention to many of the contributors here.

I fish with some of people that Bruce knows and casts with. I fish many rivers on the north end of Vancouver Island and have guided for helicopter- fishing on the remote rivers there and on the Mainland in that area....primarily through late Winter into the Spring. I fish the Dean River every summer. This year will mark the Totems 40th anniversary on the Dean. I then leave to stay on the Bulkley/ Morrice through Sept. and Oct. Often, when I leave the Skeena country, I head south to enjoy the Clearwater, Snake and Grand Ronde.
So, I'm primarily chasing Steehead for most of the year. Probably, the only time I've used a single hand rod in the last numbers of years has been for beach fishing for Salmon on the North Island.....now moving to switch rods for that.

I really appreciate that Poppy provides this forum and I'm glad we use our real names.
Dan
PS- I don't know how you put that little picture by your name.
Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #70 
Hi Dan,
Nice to see you here!
Any plans to visit Trail this year?

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Speyed trout guide on the upper Columbia
Dan Cahill

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Reply with quote  #71 
My wife will tell me when visiting her brother or sister so, might be between April to June.
Poppy Cummins

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Reply with quote  #72 
Howdy Dan,

To add an avatar pic click on control panel (left side under where it says Poppy's Spey Casting Forum, then near the bottom of that page it will say Avatar-----------view, change, delete. You can add an avatar sized pic there. If you have troble send me the picture and I'll add it to your profile.

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Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
Dan Cahill

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Reply with quote  #73 
Hi Poppy,
I'll find a picture and send it to you. Thanks for offering to assist.
Joe Congleton

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Reply with quote  #74 
My name is Joe Congeton, l am 68 and I am a flyfishaholic. Too far gone to repent.  I got this way through a lifetime of lies and deceit with teachers,  family and employers.   Early on l was merely a fishaholic,  as my family took an annual fishing trip from Kentucky to the Boundary Waters of Minnesota and Ontario and from the age of six for nearly 20 years   l was exposed to some fabulous warm water fishing.  At seven my Uncle Doc introduced me to a fly rod and taught me how to curse, both of which have attributed heavily to my undoing. Locally l rode bikes for miles to any fish holding pond and creek in the appalachian coal fields of eastern Kentucky.  Somehow l managed to stay in school, earn an Eagle Scout award and be an all-state athlete.  Went to a great southern boarding school a couple of years and then to Centre College and the University of Virginia law school.  But all l really wanted to do was bird hunt and flyfish. 

Choose to live in Knoxville Tennessee because it was then the most centrally located eastern US city with adjacent great bird and duck hunting and offered great mountain trout fishing and year round spring creek -like tailwater trout fishing.  Took a post bar- exam extended fishing -backpacking trip with my first and only (and still long suffering) wife through the Northwest (fishing the Hoh, North Platte, Yellowstone, and more) for a month before checking in to a motel in Livingston Montana, theoretically on our way back east.  At dinner that night a couple with a Virginia accent asked us to join them for dinner as we entered  the small dining room: Joe and Mary Brooks. Joe Brooks thereafter took this 25 year old under his wing . The trip home was delayed extensively and for several days we fished the area spring creeks and l was introduced to  the then local fly fishing heavyweights of the area.  Plans were made to return the next fall with Bird dogs and rods.  This life changing vacation eventually  had to end, and l had to get back to a job in the east, so the last day l fished with Brooks on Nelsons Spring creek, and two days later while driving through ST Louis headed east l heard on the radio that Joe Brooks had died in Nelsons the day after l left. But he had touched my inner soul on flyfishing , and the importance of protecting our fly waters, and through his introductions l made lifelong western friends and returned "way too many times"  to most Montana tailwaters and to Idaho to fish spring creeks, the Ranch, the Bow, and Alberta, and that little tailwater in eastern Oregon.  Along the way  became fairly adept at fly tying. 


Back in Tennessee I became heavily involved in TU, which was struggling in its infancy at the time , and basically started the chapters in some places and the state council, and was one of the three people who put the snail darter on the Endangered Species List and fought vigorously against the Tellico Dam project--so you can blame it all on me or praise me, as your politics dictate.  Through those activities and being a National Director of TU as a very young guy, l had the opportunity to fish and be friends with Lee Wulff, Leon Chandler,Nathaniel Reed,  Doug Swisher, Mike Lawson, and several other folks who were a small cadre of early flyfishing gurus "pre-movie". 

In the late 70s or early 80s l got in to bone fishing in a big way(and still love it), and subsequently acquired a flats boat in Eleuthera where l fished  a great deal.  While bone fishing l met Rob Stewart who owned the Lower Dean River Lodge.  

That led to an invitation to fish the Dean in early September, a spot l retained for many years.  Had many great trips there, at the upper and lower camps, and some great memories of some epic fish and fishermen.  Was in the Upper Camp on 9-11 with Tom McGuane and he and l each had young adult children working in NYC , and while we had news of the terrorist attacks, we had no way of learning of our children's fate for several days…made worse by the fact that we had used our liscenced  days of fishing  and could not leave the camp for three days due to no-fly restrictions; and the water was beautiful.

  On the Dean l Started out back then with a single hander RPL 9.5/ 7wt and then an RPL+ 9.5/8.  As if l didn't have enough afflictions, i became consumed , as only a flyfishaholic can understand, with raising those incredible Dean fish on tiny waking flys. I kept tinkering with patterns and eventually came up with some highly effective waking patterns and techniques and thereafter never put on a tip in any water condition.  l loved the old camp water and often never made it to supper as the last hour of daylight was usually incredible when the shadows covered the river. There were not many spey rods seen by me on the Dean in those days.  

Over time I acquired a Sage 14 foot brownie, and since there were no "modern" spey lines at the time l hit the Roanoke Va Orvis outlet and bought all the double taper Salmon lines and sink tip stuff they had on closeout for $10 a line NIB and cut and pasted my own Skagit type lines to fit the needs.  Those of you  who were on Spey Pages at its inception   may recall there was a LOT of great forward thinking line-making info passed around way back then.  Subsequently the spey rods exploded on the scene and l have had a chance to see and envy many spectacular spey casters there on the Dean   on the Copper, and elsewhere in BC as well as in TDF.  Billy Blewlett would rank up there with anyone l have seen, but then  lve never attended a Clave anywhere, nor have l stayed at a Holiday Inn Express.  I am at fault for not exploring the NW US rivers more, but l doubt l have been missed as there seem to be a lot of folks  there to make up for my absence.

Along the way l began fishing in Tierra Del Fuego and realized how inadequate my homemade lines were in the heavy winds. On a plane out from Rio Grande one year l sat next to Henrik Anderson ( who l gather was right there with Henrik Mortensen on underhand casting development) who was returning to BA from Rio Grande and had fished at another camp.  We struck up a conversation on the two handers, and he gave me a two hour yellow- pad instruction on the casting strokes and the Scandi rods as they existed then, and we bartered a little,  and as we got off the plane l ended up with his two Scierra -made scandi rods from the trip.  I still fish with them exclusively, but with the lines that have developed for their enhancement.  

I cannot say l was Poppys first customer, but l expect the Old Freightliner had not cooled off too much when l began buying all l could from him to feed the spey addiction.  l am embarrassed to say l have minimal experience on the Clearwater but l have caught some fish there and on the Salmon.  For the last dozen years or so l have spent a good deal of fall  time with my setters chukar and hun  hunting in the area; and turkey hunted there in the spring some years. Way back in the beginning  Linda has baby-sat my setters some so l could fish a little, and she and Mike have been as gracious as possible and almost too generous with everyone in my opinion.  There are not better people in this world.  And that is all l have to say about that.

Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #75 
quite a few new members lately, would be great if they posted here [cool]
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Bruce Kruk
Team Gaelforce
Speyed trout guide on the upper Columbia
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