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William Olson

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Reply with quote  #16 
Born and raised Utard.  Great grandfather brought fly fishing with him from Ireland which extended on down to myself and beyond!  Fishing has been in my blood since a very young age, and for whatever reason doing so with a fly always seemed more fun. 

However, one can only catch so many tailwater troots and almost 21 years ago to the week dad and I ventured west to Oregon.  First full day of fishing, three dunkings later (that river be slick) lightning struck.  Cast my first two hander a few months after the steelhead trip, started messing around to make my own reel about 10 months after that first trip, a reel big enough for the new-to-me rods being offered in the states...when reflecting a lot has happened over the years with so many trips it becomes a blur.  

Then I wanted to taste the experience of chasing salar.  In a large part the desire was to compare the two species, yet at the same time to provide a 'balance' of sorts to the equation.  Chased these for a few years then decided to fully concentrate on the various rivers out west.  The salmon bug bit again a few seasons ago, providing the calm to my storm of turmoil over the state of resource out west.  Basically the crash and eventual closure of Puget Sound for the wild spring steelhead fisheries.  Coupled with the increase in anglers fishing the last remaining respectable summer rivers.  In other words- no balance.

Salmon angling abroad and in E. Canada have once again provided my personal escape from the toils of modern civilization, recharging the batteries for the passion of life and unbridled enthusiasm while making the next cast...

Long live the rivers- allowing them capacity to safely harbor WILD and NATIVE salar and mykiss so future generations, fish and biped, may experience the lifecycle of the seasons... 
Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #17 
Hey Jake your not too far from me you should come up and fish sometime.
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Jake Hood

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Kruk
Hey Jake your not too far from me you should come up and fish sometime.


Bruce I'd like that, I've fished our side of the UC , in fact my profile pic was taken there, but never on the North side. I can see this happening.

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Brayden Plummer

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Reply with quote  #19 
I grew up in a little farm town in Southern Ontario.   My father was an avid fisherman to put it mildly.   For my 7th birthday I was taught how to fly fish, as I was deemed to be ready for it.   Got into tying, started fishing bass on the fly wading rivers by our cottage. Taught fly fishing camps and classes to put myself through University.  I was a strickly dry fly single hand guy for about 25 years.  Rambled around the north and ended up putting down some roots around Collingwood.   Nice and close to several rivers.  About 3 years ago I got my first spey rod and I have not looked back.   I fortunately have a fishing partner that throughly enjoys kicking my ass on the river while berating my casting, line management and flies.  His strategy of negative reinforcement has improved my skills quickly.  This year I may be good enough to offer an opinion. 6 spey rods later I am loving the new challenge and looking forward to the rivers opening up again.

Brayden
Bill Neubauer

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Reply with quote  #20 
Born and raised in Oklahoma. Started fishing at the age of three, with a cane pole, bobber, and a can of worms. Graduated to bait casting, throwing jig and pig, spinner baits, jitterbugs, you name it, I probably threw it. In my teens I picked up a fly rod and started fishing for bass with poppers. About 40 yrs ago I fell in love with Colorado and picked up and moved out here.
I've been chasing trout in the rivers and lakes ever since. Pike too! 
Several years ago I wanted to try spey casting so I've built an 11' 3wt, 11' 5wt, and 10' 6wt into two handed switch rods. The 3 is my favorite.  I use a Wulff Ambush 4 wt on it and have a blast.
Never fished for steelhead, but we do have spring runs of rainbows out of the lakes that can get to 10lbs, probably bigger. Fall runs of browns and kokanee. I've even been known to go after carp as well.
I just love to be on the water.
Todd Hirano

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Reply with quote  #21 
I was born and raised on Kauai, HI.  I fished for saltwater shoreline fish as a young kid with my grandfather.  As a middle age kid I got into fishing for largemouth bass and some smallmouth bass in our local plantation reservoirs.  I even did a little trouth fishing in our limited fishery in the high mountains on Kauai.  By this time, I took an interest in fly fishing through magazines and some clips on TV.  I bought a Fenwck glass rod and DT line through Cabela's mailorder and learned fly casting through McClaine's fly fishing encylopedia.  Having no flyfishing mentor around, I mostly gave up on fly fishing until I moved to OR in 1988.  I discovered fly fishing on the Deschutes in 1989 and have been a die hard fly fisher ever since.

I became interested in steelhead fly fishing also sometime around 1989 and also discoverd the book Dry Line Steelhead around he same time.  I returned to HI in 1990 and became a 'long distance steelheader" at that point.  In 1991 my wife got me a copy of Dry Line Steelhead for Christmas and it became my literal bible for steelheading.

In 1993 we moved to MT where my inlaws lived and I fished many of the famous trout rivers including the Gallatin, Madison, Jefferson, Missouri, Yellowstone, Bighole, Bighorn, Lamar, etc.  I enjoyed trout paradise until late 1994 when we again moved back to Kauai.

I remained on Kauai from late 94' to early 2009.  During this time I took regular trips to OR on family vacations and six trips to the Bulkley River BC. On my first trip to the Bulkley in 95' I hooked/landed my first six steelhead on dry flies (actually my first six steelhead taken on flies period).  I also took up two handed fishing at this time as well.  I started off with a Sage 9140-4 brownie built from a blank and a Cortland DT9F.

In early 2009, my family and I returned to OR.  I've resided in Springfiled, in the south Willamette Valley since that time.  My home rivers are the upper Willamette, McKenzie, North Umqpua, and central coast rivers.  I continued fishing my 9140 and 8136 and also a 6126 Echo Classic and 6126 DECHO.  By 2011 I discovered the fun of fishing old single hand glass rods with Ambush line.  I fish my glass/Ambush set ups in 6, 7, 8, and 9wt year round and I'm usually the odd man fishing a single hand rod and full floating line even througout the winter. 

I am currently fishing a cane single hand prototype built by the talented James Reid.  James provided the generous opportnity to field test this wonderful 8' 5" 9wt single hander for winter fishing.  Of course, I'm fishing a 9wt Ambush (fully integrated) line with this rod and it works like a dream this winter.

Sorry for the repetition to any of you who may have read some of my boring posts on my blog.

Todd

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Erik Helm

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Reply with quote  #22 
I am from the Midwest. Milwaukee Wisconsin to be exact. I am lucky enough to have ben on the cutting edge of American spey casting due to the original Milwaukee Boys such as Dave Pinczkowski, Rob Estlund, Joe Solakian, Bob Blumreich, etc. When Dec Hogan came here in the '90s, as well as others, they mentioned that this was the hotwater for spey casting outside the PNW in America. I cast my first two-hander in 2002, took my first trip to the western waters in 2003 and it progressed from there. I am lucky to have made friends and fishing partners of such as Rob Estlund (Speydays.com a site contemporaneous with the advent of speypages), William Olson, Little Joe of the Armenian cast and others. I have fished the PNW and the great lakes with a two-hander and swung flies since 2003.
I teach fly casting locally, as well as being an Orvis fishing manager (no dog bed jokes please) [wink]

My home waters are on the Milwaukee river and the Clearwater... those most fished, but so many others as well. I have a simple and unique perspective and an honest and reflective one on the differences in fisheries between the G.L. and the PNW, but tend toward the very traditional side of fishing.

I am honored to be chosen as a moderator for this site due to (I hope [wink]) my honesty and knowledge by Poppy.

I also am a writer, writing under the 'Classical Angler' at classicangler.BlogSpot.com

Tight lines chaps!

Erik

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Jim Williams

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Reply with quote  #23 
I am also from the Milwaukee area.  I live in a small township near there.  I was a hanger-on with the Milwaukee Boys crowd that also featured outstanding casters such as Brandon Luft and Joe Schmitt.  I was never in their league but spent a lot of time fishing with them.  I first cast a speyrod in 1985 with Mike Maxwell at the FFF Conclave in Montana, and have used them pretty consistently since then.  I have had lessons from some of the best, but it hasn't helped much.

Due to physical issues I think my days of wadefishing for steelhead, or even trout, are probably over.  I like to fish out of driftboats and jetsleds and spend time every year on the Muskegon River in Michigan.  I've fished for Atlantic Salmon on about 20 different rivers in Maritime Canada and Iceland.  I fished the Restigouche out of Sharpe's canoes for ten straight years until just a few years ago.  These days I spend more time pursuing tarpon and other flats' fish as well as smallies and muskies on rivers here in Wisconsin and Minnesota.

I use two-handed rods for all my steelhead fishing, though these days it's usually a switch rod.  I also have been known to use a two-handed surf rod to pursue musky, as well as stripers on Cape Cod.
Rob Allen

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Reply with quote  #24 
Born in Portland Oregon in 1971  Moved to the  Washougal  river in 1977  lived their until  1998 or  so  when I moved to Glide  Oregon, then to Ennis Montana   Ending up  in Vancouver Washington..  landed my  first  steelhead on a fly in 1985.  September 25th  to be  exact on a  steelhead  caddis  riffle  hitched. On the Washougal river.
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Poppy Cummins

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Reply with quote  #25 
I was born in Auburn, CA in '45. My earliest remembrance of having a fishing rod is 6 yrs old. We did all kinds of fishing, both fresh and salt using bait, lures, and then flies. I saw my first steelhead caught in the American river when I was 12 and fell in love but never fished for them until I was 26. I fell in love with the Clearwater in '64 when I made a trip from Bozeman to Walla Wall, WA. In '70 I met a girl from Orofino, ID. (the future Mrs RedShed) and we got married in '71. I first fished the Clearwater in the summer of '71 and hooked my first steelhead that same Fall using 6# mono and a candy apple red Hotshot. That fished spooled me and I think it is still headed toward the ocean. It was hooked before slack water in what is now known as the "stink hole" by the Potlatch mill. Gear fished the Clearwater every year from '71 to '85 when I got tired of working 7 days a week in Arizona and we moved to Lewiston, Id. I caught my first steelhead on a fly in 1985 with a single hand glass yellow Fenwick rod using a type 4 shooting head.

We moved to Peck, ID in '91 and I got interested in two handers in the late '90's. A factory St. Croix was $250.00 back then and was the only low priced two hander on the market but I couldn't afford one so I used that yellow single hand Fenwick blank plus half of a Fenwick "Flippin Stick" to build what is now known as the "junkyard spey".

In 2002 and my life took a 90 degree life altering turn of events and I made a major career change and decided to open a fly shop that only sold spey rods and the tackle that goes along with them. At that time that idea wasn't readily excepted by the fly fishing industry and the start was a little bumpy but the Red Shed was born. The Clearwater is really the only river I've fished much as I haven't traveled a great deal in my steelhead fishing. I think it is one of the finest "dryline" rivers in the PNW so I really don't need to go anywhere. When I leave here I'll be in a coffee can and my last stop will be at "Poppy's Riffle".

  


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Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
Gene Larson

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Reply with quote  #26 
I was born and raised in Kansas.  I went fishing a few times as a kid in a muddy creek and caught a few bullheads on chicken guts.  A buddy of mine in high school liked to fish and I went with him a few times.  I saw his dad fishing with a fly rod a couple of times and was intrigued by it.  After college I went to work in Columbia, MO and was introduced to trout fishing at the Missouri Trout parks.  Quickly decided that if I fished with a fly I could get out of the crowd in the natural bait area.  Bought a Berkley Parametric fly rod and taught myself how to fish.  Job took to Illinois and out of fishing for a few years.  Then I discovered the Au Sable river in Michigan and the addiction began to grow.  The idea of spey fishing was enticing enough that I took the plunge over a year ago and am enjoying the learning curve. I'm a year older than Poppy and look forward to meeting him and lot more of you this fall at the Clearwater Clave.  I'll be the one with two Golden Retrievers trying to get food from anyone they can.  
Gonzalo Vissoso

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Reply with quote  #27 
Bruce!!...... Kudos for this topic! poppy's life is something to read [smile]
ChuckHoltorf

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Reply with quote  #28 
Hello Bruce.  Thanks Poppy, great site.   In 1968 I started fly fishing with my dad on his home streams near Mt. Shasta Ca., the Sacramento R. around Cantera loop, the forks above the steel bridge (under water now-box canyon dam), and past Dunsmuir. McCLoud R., Castle lakes and more. Used a Wright and McGill Pack rod and Pflueger from the Pullman Wa. hardware store, where I grew up. About 1970, now with a Fenwick and a Shakespeare automatic, Dad and I would drive from Pullman on the backroads to Kelly Ck., hike into Cayuse Ck., Red Ive's on the St. Joe, Wallawa streams, and several trips with the Clearwater Flycasters. I was the youngest member. Great Mentors those Old Boys. Now I'm feeling Old and cathartic… Fished the Grande Ronde mornings with the Gents, Chukar hunting in the afternoon. Wenaha R. too. Dad and I drove up and down the N. Fork of the Clearwater R. watching the last log drives to the mill in Lewiston Id. before they put the final plug in Orofino. Then in High School started training as a white water river guide on the Salmon R., Middle fork, and Hells Canyon. Six years of summers on the rivers and under the wonderful Idaho clear skies and stars. Garcia glass rod with the old Pflueger when I moved to Seattle for grad school, trying for steelhead on the Stilly early '80's, hooked and was toyed with, but never landed one. Deschutes float with a friend summer of '84 was a education!. Then reality, get a job. Jump to '89, Sage 10' RPL was next with a Lamson for the westside rivers. 2005 I was on the Ronde when a guy stopped to chat and convinced me to get a two handed rod. CND solstice 6/7 and I was all in. Now a few rods later I enjoy the long lines. More casting than fishing. Raising a family only lets me get out for a hour or two for fine tuning lines and my mind. Therapy I call it. Fish when I can from Bellingham Wa., Skagit line with a older Scott, The CND with a Vision, Deer Creek with a lovely Carron.

Poppy, Thanks for the advise, and tackle,

Chuck









Leo Moore

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Reply with quote  #29 
Born in Fredericton, New Brunswick and now live in Sussex, New Brunswick via Campbellton and Bathurst. Married a girl from Bathurst. Fish for Atlantic salmon, mostly on the Miramichi river. Started with the spey rod in 2004. Rarely touch a single hander anymore.
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Bob Rodgers

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Reply with quote  #30 
Born in South Carolina and was introduced at a very early age to fishing by way of farm ponds and bluegills. I was immediately and hopelessly addicted.
Ended up out west, in Reno years later. Fly fished (rather poorly in hindsight) the Truckee, Lake Pyramid, and every alpine stream or lake we could get to. Eventually ended up in Florence, OR since I wanted fish measured in pounds instead of inches Opened a tiny-TINY flyshop consisting mostly of materials and salmon and steelhead flies, all tied in-house. Found a tremendous shad run on the Siuslaw River virtually untouched by flyfishers. Did some guiding.
 
Got bit by the saltwater flyfishing bug....badly. Moved to South Padre, Texas, learned to run and pole a shallow water skiff and started guiding for redfish and sea trout. Got a job offer from a Texas madman to go into Mexico and open a fishing lodge. We’d target tarpon and snook in lakes connected underground (Cenotes) to the ocean that had never been fished. The fishing was incredible but the madman was more than we could handle. Back in Texas, was hired to run a bonefish lodge in Belize. Proving beyond any doubt we were slow learners, we took that job on. The hospitality business sucked, but the fishing was good, very good.
 
Took what I had learned about bonefish, tarpon, and permit and headed for the Keys. Guided down there until sun exposure, injury and age drove me out of the business. Had made a couple of trips to Arkansas over the years to gather material for some magazine articles we were assigned and ended up moving here and starting a new career.

I resumed a passion for 1911 pistols that I developed during service in the Marine Corps and started a business customizing them. Left fishing completely for about 8 years to devote myself to the new business. My wife, in an attempt to get me out of the shop, suggested a steelhead trip back out west. We went to the CW (her dad was born in Ahsahka in 1907) and I was again doomed. Got a 2h rod, then another, then...as I said, doomed.
 
Looking back on my life, I realize I never had a real job. It’s been a hell of a ride, though.[smile]
Bob
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