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Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #1 

Interesting to see if tackle choices are made by where you live and fish, and of course it would help us t get to know each other.

I live in a little town called Trail in BC that is on the Columbia river, pretty much right on the US border where the Columbia flows into Washington state.
I fish all over for steelhead but my home water for steel would be the Clearwater.
I like big water and use big rods, usually a 16ftr and long belly shooting heads in the 70-75ft range.

Lets hear from you guys!

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Bruce Kruk
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Dave Tucker

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Reply with quote  #2 
Parma Idaho,
I grew up fishing Idaho's Salmon river with a 9ft rod and shooting heads (before the two hander comeback). I have called a few rivers my home - Stilly, Hoh, Bogachiel, but nowadays I play mostly on the lower 40 miles of the Grande Ronde. You will find me based somewhere around Boggans from the last of September to Thanksgiving. Some years I go back to the river in February and March but that has become such a nymphing game that I have left it alone the last few years.

Most of the year however I am stuck guiding for picky brown trout on an Eastern Oregon desert tailwater.

I like 14 foot rods and have gradually moved to Skagit lines for the ease of casting when I hand them off to clients. I am not a casting Jedi, but I can tie flies that catch fish.

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Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #3 
`but I can tie flies that catch fish`

That is the biggest understatement that I`ve heard in some time Dave!

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Rick Jorgensen

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Reply with quote  #4 
Actually born and raised in the Philippines - my dad moved there from Washington in 1927!!!  But I moved to Arcata CA - Humboldt State for college and have pretty much stayed in N CA since 1968 - home waters would be the Klamath - awesome river!!!! Last 5-6 years I have been migrating out for trips to the Clearwater and Grande Ronde and also fish Oregon a lot and more recently the OP rivers. Started out using long lines - signed up for the first Rogue River Clinic put on by Steve C and Way Y which was fabulous!!!

I have developed shoulder/elbow issues and have since migrated to skagits. Have spent a lot of time with Scott O and Mike M on trips and to a lesser extent Ed and Jerry French and they have all provided me absolutely great opportunities to pick up their techniques allowing me to use very little effort to cast all day for multiple days.

I really like the shorter and lighter rods  - I have one 15' 9 wt (Scott ARC 1509) and all others are 13' or less. I love the light rods - I built a Anglers Roost 12' 2/3 wt that is awesome on the Klamath and GR!! And one of my favorite sticks is an old 1980s 10' 7 wt Fisher that I converted to a switch with a short bottom grip.

I retire from an engineering firm I have been with for 38 years in just under 2 years and plan to sell everything, buy a truck and big trailer and go where the fish are - OP. Idaho, Skagit if it ever comes back,  and of course the Klamath.

I do have a passion for spring creek trout so will spend time on some of my favorite waters such as Silver Creek with my trusty Scott 8' 2 wt G series rod!!!!

Dennis Kulhanek

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Reply with quote  #5 
I live in Caledon Ont. Where I fish local streams for trout with 7'5" #4 & #5 split-bamboo Leonards. Besides that I take two extended trips to fish for atlantic salmon. Summer in Quebec and Nova Scotia in the fall, where in two hand rods I use 13'3" BIIx Winston or Sage 7126 TCX. In single hand I use 896 RPL Sage for dry fly. If given chance to fish Moisie or Saint-Jean on north shore or Restigouche and not fishing from canoe and situation permit I use 10150-3 Sage set with 75 9/10 Carron.
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Pierre Noel

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi , I was born in Bathurst ,New Brunswick . I now live in Halifax Nova Scotia. I lived in Bathurst for most of my life until 1996 when I moved to Nova Scotia. I used to fish in new Brunswick with single hand rods and was successful enough for my taste.i only target Atlantic salmon and if I reach ten in a year I'm happy . I'm a live releaser since 2000. Three years ago I switched to two hand rods . I had been thinking about it for a couple years because of shoulder problems. I haven't looked back and fish 12.5 to 15 ft rods. I do return to new Brunswick one or two times a year but fuel being so expensive has been keeping me in my back yard . So now I fish the Margaree, the Philip and the East rivers. My longest lines are 10/11 carrons at 65 ft . I have mostly mid bellies but do own one skagit. This past winter I bought five new skagits and two new rods. To compliment all of this I began tying my own flies. Nothing beats hooking up on a fly you have tied yourself.
I really get a thrill swinging flies and sending them out there over a hundred feet. Makes no difference if I hook up. 2013 season was pretty good to me as I hooked 10 salmon and one grilse. The biggest salmon measured 42 in. And was hooked on a 13 footer I thought I would never hook up on, jinx thing.
I hooked that grilse one evening and it was through the tongue. I had intentions on releasing it and did. The barb had made the fish bleed and when I revived and let it go the fish turned over upside down. I felt really bad about this and swore under my breath but could do nothing as it had floated away. So I returned to fishing and a few minutes later hooked a big salmon. So the fight is on and I'm playing this fish and had to wade down the river a bit. Here I am 15 footer fighting a fish and all of a sudden there is the grilse next to me upside down. Then I was feeling bad, here I am fighting a big fish and one upside down on the bank. What to do. This is a least 20 min later. So I decide to check the one on the bank while fighting the one on the rod. When I touched it it moved, oh I thought he's got a chance. I turned him upright and placed a rock on each side of him and promised to be back. I finishe landing the other one and released it . By now it's been 25-30 minutes, I get back to the grilse bring him to faster water and give him plenty of time to come back and then he swam off. I never felt better about fishing. That fish would live. Believe it or not.
Charles Kadish

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Reply with quote  #7 
I was born in Chicago and now live in the NW suburbs of Chicago. I lived on the East Coast from 1965 until 1995 when I moved back to the Chicago area. While in the East I began Atlantic salmon fishing and have fished the Miramichi River in NB every season since 1984.

I "discovered" the Muskegon River in Michigan when I attended the first clave held in Newago, Michigan, ten or twelve years ago. I have been hooked on steelhead ever since. Love the fish, love the Muskegon River, and most of all the other fishermen I have met in pursuing steelhead.

On the Muskegon, I generally fish from a boat using a Guideline DDC Connect intermediate belly with a sink tip and, sometimes, sinking scandi heads. Lately, I have been using intermediate skagit lines like the RIO iFlight. Usually use a 13 to 14-foot rod.

I seldom use anything longer than an 11-foot switch rod and a floating line when fishing for Atlantics.

That's pretty much it for me.
Darryl Rigets

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Reply with quote  #8 
Born and raised on the west coast of Canada, Vancouver Island in a small mill town, Port Alberni.
The Stamp River is my home river but I try to fish as many other BC rivers as possible.
Started fishing with my dad when I was 4 or 5 he graduated me to gillie (well actually the pack horse) when I was 6, I was big enough to pack the gear but too young to be too close to the river. He couldn't stand the complaining every weekend so he bought me a 7'6 Eagle Claw spinning rod and a Mitchel 304 Cap that year and I've been hooked ever since.
Caught my first steelhead by myself when I was 10 in a small stream that was across the road from where my family lived.
I started fly fishing when I was 12 with an 8' Eagle Claw. Worked in my uncles fishing shop from 14-18. Met Haig-Brown while working at the fishing shop, he wasn't pleased with our selection of fly's I wasn't sure if he lost his fly box while fishing the Stamp or if he left them at home, he didn't stick around to chat. After he left the shop I thought I recognized his face but couldn't figure out where. I was reading a book that I found on the shelf above the toilet, (A River Never Sleeps) so on my break I continued to read from where I left off the visit before and there on the slip cover was that face.  I have been reading his writing ever since and have them all.

I fished a lot in the 60's 70s and 80s with gear and fly. I returned to school for 4 years beginning 1990 and then started my own business.  Needless to say I really haven't fished much since maybe a few days to a week in the spring, fall and winter a little more often the past few years. I figure I better hurry up before its too late.
I started with the double handed rod in 1998, a Sage DS 9140 and a wind cutter 8/9/10 on the Bulkley.
I have bought a few more rods since the DS.
Its interesting how buying fishing gear and related accessories helps to fill the void between trips to the river, I think its a symptom of the disease [smile]
Eric Northway

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Reply with quote  #9 
I was born and raised in a tiny little town in Iowa, on the Des Moines River. I started fishing by myself when I was 7 or 8 years old, drowning chicken livers for catfish. A couple years later I began spin fishing for bass. A couple years later my dad and me took a trip to Springfield, MO, to the (at that time) only Bass Pro Shop. It was a pilgramige of sorts for me, and I talked Dad into buying me a Cortland rod/reel kit (8 wt.), a starter tying kit, a second hand tying manual, and the Orvis book (I had to work off every red cent of it, btw [smile]). I knew NO ONE who chucked flies or tied. No one. I learned on my own. I was hooked almost immediately, both literally and figuratively. After college I guided for a few seasons in Alaska, worked in a fly shop in Nashville for a number of years, and co-managed a shop and guided near Aspen, CO. In between all of this I pursued grad and post-grad degrees. I did my PhD in northern England, where I was truly introduced to two-hand casting. When I was done in the UK, I took a teaching position at Iowa State University, where I taught for 10 years. I now live in the Boise area, and teach at a local college. I moved back out West primarily to chase steelhead and trout in beautiful places, and to do so I had to take a massive (massive!) pay cut. It was one of the best decisions I've made in my life.

My steelhead 'homewaters' are the Salmon and Clearwater, and I've done some exploratory steel chasing in Oregon and Washington (much more to come this Spring). I'm not a very good two-hand caster, but I manage to catch the occasional metalhead. I've met some fantastic steelhead folks in ID, who have been very, very kind to me, aiding tremendously with casting suggestions, and the how-to's of hooking fish in these big waters.

I have a Loop Cross S1 7120-4 that I built, and love. It is a canon. In the hands of someone who really knew what they were doing, it would probably fire line more like a missile. I started, a number of moons ago, with a 7/8 St. Croix. I also have a Burk 8142-4 that I picked up from Poppy a few weeks ago. I really like underhand casting, and Scandi heads. It just seems to work for my casting style (or, lack thereof). I will, however, use Skagit heads if I really have to add a big chunk of heavy T-line, but I prefer not to fish that way if I can get away with a sinking poly leader (or short, light, T-line) on the Scandi head. I know. Anathema.

I've got tons to learn: rivers, casting, tying classic patterns, etc. But, I've chosen to make it a life-style, and more importantly, a journey with no real destination other than improvement. The occasional fish is nice, but I'm 'in it' for way, way more than simply landing a chromer.
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Reply with quote  #10 
Kansas City

12 hours from the Rockies, the Gulf Coast, or the Great Lakes.

Half a day to some pretty decent Ozark trout (spring creeks and tailwaters)

Pretty decent warm water around, including smallmouth, Hillbilly Coho (white bass)
and some ocassional hybrids and stripers thrown in.  Catfish, carp, drum, are always
possibilities...

2-handed rods from 10' 5wt to 13'6" 8/9.  Single hand from 3wt to 11wt.
Bill Pierce

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Reply with quote  #11 
Bruce great idea to give a little background on who we are. When someone posts by force of habit I look under their name to see where they are from.
Massachusetts born and raised I Started fishing with a spinning setup as a kid with my father and brothers. My father has since passed and none of my brothers fish any longer. When I was a senior in high school I bought a fly setup from a buddy for $20 bucks. Other than a brief stint with a noodle rod for Great Lakes Steelies it's been fly rods for me. Mostly trout and landlocked salmon but being only a half hour from the coast American Shad and Stripers are great sport with fly rod also. Four years ago I retired after thirty two years as a firefighter and about that time I bought a switch rod but I got to use a buddies CND Northfork and I liked it so much I sold the switch and bought one. Since then I've added a Burkie 8134 and made two trips to the Clearwater and several to the Bonaventure in Quebec.

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DaveEvans

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Reply with quote  #12 
Good idea for a thread.  Like Bill I keep looking to see where everyone is from.  I was a forest service brat so we moved every three years between logging towns in northern Idaho, eastern WA, and eastern OR.  My dad was stationed in Enterprise OR when I was in 6th grade to a freshman.  His district included Hell's Canyon so we fished the Snake a lot, and that is where I got my first steelhead on a mepps spinner.  A couple of buddies and I would also backpack into the Eagle Caps and catch dozens of trout on flies and spinning bobbers.  Took up a fly rod about 25 years ago when my job took me to Yellowstone during a summer, and started tying about 20 years ago.  About that time my job took me to Fayetteville Arkansas so fly fished the tailwaters on the white river a lot, but also took 2-3 weeks every summer to go out to eastern WA to fish with friends on the St. Joe and the North Fork of the Clearwater and would hit Yellowstone on the way.  One of those deals where you don't realize what you have until it is gone and I was very homesick for the west when living in AR.  Finally got back to eastern WA 11 years ago and now live in Pullman.  You can find me several times a week on the Snake or Clearwater during the fall, and on cutthroat water in Idaho for weeks at a time during summer.  I just finished my third season of using two-handed rods so still a beginner.  Poppy (nice having Red Shed as your home fly shop!) put me in touch with Craig Lannigan for lessons, he is a great teacher, and I have been addicted ever since.  Used scandi's my first two years and moved to 45' and 55' fall favorites on my 7 and 8 wts this past year and love the longer lines.  Would love to get a 15' rod and learn the 70'.
Jonathan Barlow

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Reply with quote  #13 
Born in England, Navy brat. My dad resigned his commission when I was eleven and we immigrated to Canada. Raised in Toronto ( on the same street where Preston Quon now lives). My grandad taught me to fly fish and introduced me to "salmon" rods. My wife and I moved to Vancouver BC 25 years ago and got back in to fishing then. Started steelheading because of Matt Suzuki, who took me to the Thompson for the first time and fishing with a two handed rod.

Home water is the Squamish ( some of you may have had a copy of my Squamish portfolio last year). But I also fish the Clearwater and the Skeena system. I mostly fish long rods (17') but have been getting into grass rods lately and spent most of last year fishing a 13 6/7 bamboo.

When fishing I mostly just fish but I have been known to get distracted enough to take the odd photo.

JB

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Mike Papais

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Reply with quote  #14 
I was born and raised in a small tight knit community in the north/west part of Toronto . My dad introduced my brother and I to brook trout at a young age . Every weekend we would load up in the station wagon and head north to seek out these delicate fish . Around the age of 12 , I bought a book on fly fishing and was hooked ever since . At 14 I started lashing feathers to hooks with a pair of vice-grips that my dad "lost" . Though they were not the prettiest flies , the trout seemed to like them a lot . A few years later , my brother and I started pursuing steelhead and salmon with the fly rod after reading an article in Fly Fisherman magazine .... we were not as successful as we thought we'd be and started using "noodle" rods . In the late 80's we were part of a small group of Ontario fisherman that were using center-pin reels brought over from England . It wasn't long after we befriended a machinist who had the same passion for steelhead and our custom center pin reels came to life . Even though most center pin guys were using roe , I stuck to small flies run beneath my float and did just as good as , if not better some days as the guys fishing guts . My awakening came when a large buck took a big soft hackle as I was retrieving my float .... the fly was on the swing !! That's when the float rods were packed away in the closet and I started using long single handers to purse the wild chromers that ran the rivers of Georgian Bay .

I now live about an hour north of Toronto , in Barrie , with my amazing wife and three beautiful children ..... 6 two-handers crafted by Bob Meiser and 5 wide drum reels , with another on the way from William . I am about 20min away from the river that I love to swing my flies that I now tie in hand due to an elbow injury .


Mike

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Jake Hood

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Reply with quote  #15 
Great idea Bruce ! I'm a Spokane boy born and bred. I've been fishing since I was just a small boy but didn't start fly angling until I was 20. That was thirty plus years ago and i threw myself into it head long. In 1989 I was licensed to guide for the first time and have guided off and on ever since. I went to work at the old Spokane Angler in 1991 and since then have worked in three fly shops in the Spokane/CDA area. The last shop was @ Whites which I left behind to work as a sales rep for Powell Fly Rods among others, including TFO and JRyall Reels, for an ever so brief stint before they went customer direct ( and sullied a once great name forever imo ) .

I was first introduced to steelhead fishing back in the late 80's but oddly preferred the lack of crowds on my trout streams after a long season of guiding. Even with that I took my first lesson spey casting from George Cook twenty years ago but didn't catch my first steelhead on a long rod until 2005. Unlike many here , I have primarily been skagit casting for my entire spey experience so far and only recently began looking beyond this style to include classic spey casting. 

I don't claim a home water but enjoy all of the LC Valley waters and am getting to know the Ronde and the Snake. I feel especially graced when I land a Clearwater fish. I have spent well over a 1000 days in the oar seat on the Clark Fork in the St. Regis area and will always consider that my favorite river for trout , although those North Idaho cutthroat streams are a very close second. I'm really enjoying incorporating trout switch and spey styles into my fishing on these waters. 

The thing that continues to inspire me in all of my fly fishing , especially with a spey rod , is that I never stop learning.

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