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Brian Moffat

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Hello all. I strictly fish for summer fish with 95% of my time on a small Skeena trib. I have only ever fished with a skagit head and a sink tip with wet flies such as hairwings and the like. This year I plan on using a floating line if conditions allow. My question is this; how do you present the fly on the swing with the floating line? Do you fish it the same as with a tip with the exception of the pull back mend to set up the drift? I am sure that I am overthinking this but my mind is already getting ready for my fall trip.
Thanks for any helpbor insite,
Brian
Troy Peters

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Reply with quote  #2 
Brian,
It is exactly the same.

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Eric DeJong

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Reply with quote  #3 
Well, I don't fish it the same way as sink tip and deeply sunk fly .  Although specific conditions may dictate otherwise, with a floating line and a hairwing or other classic wet fly, my goal is to cast at as steep an angle as I can to effectively cover the water and mend as little as possible.
Ken Campbell

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Reply with quote  #4 
It is not the same. Practice swimming your fly. A deeply sunk fly on a tip behaves differently than a wet on a dry line. Set one up and fish it short and watch your fly. The best way to learn how to swim a wet on a dry line is by fishing a bomber and paying attention to how it behaves.
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Rick Jorgensen

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good points - much depends on the type of water/run you are fishing. I agree with as little mending as possible but you may want to fish  the fly as much broadside as possible or the more traditional down and across swing and you may still want to move the fly as slowly as possible or you may want to speed it up - so really no set method works in every situation.

Might want to look for Dry Line Steelhead by Bill McMillan
http://www.amazon.com/Dry-Line-Steelhead-Other-Subjects/dp/0936608625
Ken Campbell

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Reply with quote  #6 
Greased Line Fishing by Jock Scott is another book you'll want to memorize....
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Larry Aiuppy

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No disrespect to the writers of essential classics, like Bill McMillan (Dry Line Steelhead); “Jock Scott” and A.H.E. Wood (Greased Line Fishing for Salmon); or, for that matter, Dec Hogan (A Passion For Steelhead); Troy Combs (Steelhead Fly Fishing, The Steelhead Trout, Steelhead Fly Fishing and Flies); or Bob Arnold, John Shewey, Barry Thornton, Mike Maxwell, Deke Meyer, etc., et al.. I’ve got them all, and wouldn’t be without, but the best book I have found, by far, on all variations of presenting the fly to steelhead, including specific dry line-wet fly methods, is John Larison’s exhaustive The Complete Steelheader – Successful Fly Fishing Tactics.


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Larry Aiuppy

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Oops. That would be Trey Combs.
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Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #9 
Personal favorite is "Fine and Far Off" by jock scott
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Troy Peters

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Reply with quote  #10 
Well I fish a wet fly on dry line the same way I do as on a sink tip. How I mend can vary greatly with both a dry line and a sink tip depending on conditions. A greased line presentation or say a crossfield presention can both be used on a deep sunk fly.
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Tim Rawlins

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Reply with quote  #11 
Pay close attention and know exactly what your fly is doing or you may end up skating your fly when you think your swimming it.  Not that that wont produce results. At minimum, keep your fly under water, and it the water.
Rick Jorgensen

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Reply with quote  #12 
you might be surprised if you riffle hitch your wet!!!
Tim Rawlins

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Jorgensen
you might be surprised if you riffle hitch your wet!!!


Thus my answer, "not that it wont produce results" when I suggested keeping your fly under water.  Its not near as satisfying for me to catch a fish by way of accidental methodology.  Like making a bank shot in basketball when you didn't yell, "Bank!"  Note: Most of my fish are caught by accident.     
Rick Jorgensen

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But Tim, Have you ever hooked a steelhead when you were wading back to the bank with the rod over your shoulder reeling in!![confused]
Tim Rawlins

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Jorgensen
But Tim, Have you ever hooked a steelhead when you were wading back to the bank with the rod over your shoulder reeling in!![confused]
 Haha!  No but I have actually heard of that happening.  Did that happen to you?

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