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Dave Green

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Reply with quote  #31 
Is it just me,or does anybody else feel that stripping is hardly a waste of good fishing time,or that their fly is not fishing on the strip?
I realise this discussion is likely pertaining mostly to steelhead,and I don't have enough experience with those to be any kind of authority,but I've taken a good many Atlantics on the strip,and have pulled my fly literally out of their mouth a good many more times fishing SHers as I made that list strip/haul and lifted my line to cast,only to see a big boil as I ripped my fly outta the water from an unseen Atlantic that was following it.
Being landlocked in Alberta these days,my searun angling has been severely and sadly limited in recent years,so I spend far more time swinging for freshwater trout,and would guess that I take as many fish on the strip as I do actually swinging the same streamers.
Again,I get that for the most part were discussing steelhead here,but I guess I'm likely just so programmed to beleive that I can,have,do,and will take fish on the strip that I've just never really considered it any sort of "waste of time",to the contrary,in regards to trout fishing especially,I fully expect to take fish on the strip and am actively "fishing" that streamer to the bitter end.In fact,there's times trout fishing even with a short Scandi or Skagit head that I would like to retreive the fly further then practical for casting to cover the close water thoroughly,generally when stepping in at the head of a run.That said,I do always start with short casts and methodically lengthen the line until I reach my casting limit then step down,but just sayn',sometimes short isn't short enough to cover the nearest water,where really one might only need the leader outside of the rod tip to reach holding water literally a rods length away.
Paul Dudley

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Reply with quote  #32 
You deserved this one Will and KNOW that the bandwagon was going to get jumped on LOL...

I was just thinking about my B&W switch rod for the high water tomorrow and now you got me packing my damn big rod and line!!!

Ah well....I am planning on being around hamilton at some point 
Erik Helm

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Reply with quote  #33 
Yup.
"The bearer of evil tidings when he was half-way there, remembered that evil tidings were a dangerous thing to bear..."
Robert Frost

By pointing out the pink elephant in the room, based on years of experience, and given that the pink elephant bears the banners of major trends in lines, rods, and style and based on personalities and 'revolutions', we have blowback. I think we all need to read between the lines and step back and think a bit. Perhaps there is some truth to this, especially for summer run fish and how it also applies and is effected by casting angles... or the lack of them.

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Old skool caster who just has a ball on the river, no matter how the fishing is!
Reginald Denny

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Reply with quote  #34 
I don't see this as a debate between which is better. But it definitely is about folks that have different abilities and needs on a river. Mr. J obviously fishes a relatively small river, and has never had a reason to use or learn a long line,  or understand the advantages of one, nor does he know how to use one, as is evident by the fact that he can not do it "without "pain", and by his video and obvious mentorship of other short liners. This is great for him, and how he should fish, it's just seems a bit odd that he has such convicted views about the long line, which he knows very little about.
Commonly, I read regularly of folks with preconceived notions about things they have no experience with, or at least, no proper understanding about in casting. It takes a long time, and dire commitment to a long line to understand it and learn how to make it do what it is capable of, on a river that it works on, and that's not a coastal stream that's 100" wide. Truth is, short lines are great if you want to fish relatively short, and they are very easy to get proficient with, and do what you want to do with them in their place. But they will never, ever reach the performance level of a long line when one feels the need or necessity to cast the fly high and far- And neither will ever be "Better" than the other, but "Better suited to a condition" they will both at times be-
Fishing a short line on the Thompson, Clearwater or Snake river makes about as much sense as entering a donkey in the Kentucky derby, and fishing a Long line on the OP, N. Umpqua, etc. is equally as ridiculous as entering a VW bug in a tractor pulling contest.
Simply put, they both have their place, and are equally effective in said application.
Anyone knows, time spent stripping is time the fly isn't fishing, and if you want to catch a fish, that is WASTING TIME- If some don't care about wasted opertunity while swinging, then it's not wasting time for those folks, and that is fine for them. Everyone has a different motive on the river, and I will be the first to say, that when I'm on the river the only focus is to maximize my chance to get a take, I'll leave the bird watching, line stripping, and flower smelling for others, and I'll utilize those opportunity's during walks in the park. To each their own-
Best on the river-
Reggy [smile]
Rick Jorgensen

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Reply with quote  #35 

actually Reggie - you really don't know much about me and did not read my posts carefully! I started with long lines and used them for a number of years - starting with the RIO accelerator and then using the xlt's - 90' heads on a Scott 1287 and did very well with them!! The first classes I took were from Steve Choate and Way Yin and they got me hooked on long lines

I have elbow and shoulder issues now (not related to casting) so I looked for options where I could cast with minimal hand/arm motion and if you tell me that you can cast a long line continuously with your top hand never getting above your shoulder and your elbows never leaving your side - I would like to see it!!! You need a longer stroke and it helps to be using a longer rod. It is much easier for me to be using a 12' to 13' rod all day. A longer rod is a longer fulcrum and in fact can be more tiring over a long day on the water than a shorter one. I know, because I use my 1509 on the Clearwater quite a bit - probably the only time it sees the light of day and using that all day - even when using short heads and small strokes is not near as relaxing as throwing lines on a rod under 13 feet.

PS - and by the way, stripping line when stepping down isn't wasting time

Best,
Rick

Reginald Denny

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Reply with quote  #36 
1. Unless a post is 100 % pro Skagit casting, you will throw a monkey wrench in the discussion. I see why William was angry- 
2. Stripping is a waste of time, but strip on, I'll fish while you strip![smile]
3. Peace on Earth-
Brian Yates

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Reply with quote  #37 
I like stripping, It keeps young unmarried mothers in work, Keeps them fit dancing around the pole and what else would I do with my dollar bills, Wait that is what we are talking about right?
Rick Jorgensen

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Reply with quote  #38 
Reg - since when is making a point that disagrees with your ideas throwing a monkey wrench into the mix? and if you read my posts on many boards over a long time you will see that I am not pro Skagit - I use short head systems and mainly Skagit as that is what I have come to use for various reasons but I have never bashed other methods and in fact still love the long lines.  Hell some of my good friends are center-pinners and I even associate with .....gasp.... some long liners!! The original reason I switched was due to injury and since then as I get older I am looking for ways that allow me to fish for multiple days without tiring. I can hold 60 to 70 feet in the air with a single hand rod and lay it down but I can hold 30 to 40 feet in the air and shoot 30 feet a lot easier and much prefer doing this all day long

I don't personalize things unless someone starts it and your statement

"has never had a reason to use or learn a long line,  or understand the advantages of one, nor does he know how to use one, as is evident by the fact that he can not do it "without "pain"

is totally false and misguided as is your statement

Fishing a short line on the Thompson, Clearwater or Snake river makes about as much sense as entering a donkey in the Kentucky derby, and fishing a Long line on the OP, N. Umpqua, etc. is equally as ridiculous as entering a VW bug in a tractor pulling contest.

I know a number of folks that use short line systems on both the Thompson and Clearwater and do very well and seem to enjoy themselves
DaveEvans

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Reply with quote  #39 
Shooting heads, short mid long-bellies.  To each their own.  I probably waste more time looking at the osprey and eagles when they are around than some people do stripping![biggrin]
Wayne Loren

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Reply with quote  #40 
I for one, have always agreed with Poppy`s "philosophy" about Fishing--Basically stated--Who should care about how a person casts or fishes, if the person is within the regulations and having fun, why should anyone else concern themselves.

Although I must admit that I do enjoy reading about other angler`s experiences and opinions-whether I agree or do not agree really does not matter to me. I just like to read about how other people enjoy their day on the river and in the great outdoors.
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