Poppy's Spey Casting Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Jason Bates

Member
Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #1 
Ok so I am brand new to cutting and splicing fly lines, but I am interested in possibly making some modifications to a line or two that I currently have. Before I go too far, I thought I might get some suggestions from those who have already done a bit of line modifications. Since I know the obvious tip is to “buy Al Buhr’s book”, I have done that much already, and his book is great! It still leaves me pretty uncertain about how best to start...

I have a Beulah Aero head that I like alright, but I would love it a bit longer, and would love to make it a sink tip as well. Currently it is 510 grains, but I’m ok going upwards to something more in the 600 grain range with an overall head length in the 60-65’ range. I have other lines and tips etc that I would be happy to sacrifice to the process, but I don’t really want to mangle a bunch of lines for a Frankenstein line that’s no fun to cast at all.

Any thoughts, comments, suggestions?
JB
Graham Hill

Member
Registered:
Posts: 78
Reply with quote  #2 
I have been slicing and dicing for a few decades.  I progressed from epoxy and splicing jigs to welding and I have made quite a few Frankenlines.  I have recently seen some really crazy welded projects that basically have gone wrong....or in some cases really, really wrong.  They do hold together but most cast like extension cords.  I have repaired or modified quite a few for other anglers.  I would suggest a different idea  for your first project...treat your Beulah as if it is a tip and add it to a Rio Windcutter "first body" of suitable weight and diameter.  Those original Windcutters are looped and have an integrated running line.  You would find out the best criteria for a slice and dice without cutting into the Aerohead.   Topher Browne wrote about adapting old Windcutters to Scandi casting using the first bodies and tips.  Google "RIO lines for underhand casting".  I have been doing that for a few years now and it is a great idea!  Regards, Graham.
Rick Jorgensen

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 142
Reply with quote  #3 
just started playing with this and a guide friend gave me some pointers - good if the two lines are at least close to same diameter - slip on a piece of 50# hollow core braid - I have Gudebrod but not sure it is made anymore but think Cortland makes it. you can just but the two line pieces together and nail knot to braid on either side. A bit stronger connection is to use a razor and cut each at a diagonal so they fit together - use Loctite 414 crazy glue - good on plastics and glue together then slip braid over and proceed with the nail knot. You can coat the knot and even the braid if you want with some flex coating
Bruce Kruk

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 360
Reply with quote  #4 
do you want to fish the lines or simply cast them is a good question as to which way of splicing would be best


__________________
Bruce Kruk
Team Gaelforce
Speyed trout guide on the upper Columbia
Jason Bates

Member
Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks guys. I had wondered if perhaps this was a bit ambitious of a project, but I was hopeful that I might be able to make up a mid head length line for some winter fishing. For just casting practice I really wouldn’t want anything to do with a sink tip line, and would probably prefer something in the 450-525 grain window (which I have), this project would be to expand what, when, and where I am able to fish a longer line.
I know I could purchase a new line fro Nexcast, or Galeforce, or Ballistic, which would probably be far better than what I can piece together but the costs ther are prohibitive, and I have a variety of lines that don’t get a lot of use, so I thought it might be a fun project. My basic thoughts were to try to add a bit more body length and/or extend the back taper a bit, then cut 10-15 feet of the front to be replaced by a 15’ sink tip.
JB

Rick Jorgensen

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 142
Reply with quote  #6 
think the method I suggested would work fine for what you want to do using hollow braid. For the front sink tip I would just make small loops with the hollow brain and loop the sink tip to the main line - keep to floating tip as well for an easy switch out
cris caldwell

Member
Registered:
Posts: 42
Reply with quote  #7 
I have had good luck using red hot blue glue on PVC lines 
Zack Williams

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 29
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Bates
Thanks guys. I had wondered if perhaps this was a bit ambitious of a project, but I was hopeful that I might be able to make up a mid head length line for some winter fishing. For just casting practice I really wouldn’t want anything to do with a sink tip line, and would probably prefer something in the 450-525 grain window (which I have), this project would be to expand what, when, and where I am able to fish a longer line.
I know I could purchase a new line fro Nexcast, or Galeforce, or Ballistic, which would probably be far better than what I can piece together but the costs ther are prohibitive, and I have a variety of lines that don’t get a lot of use, so I thought it might be a fun project. My basic thoughts were to try to add a bit more body length and/or extend the back taper a bit, then cut 10-15 feet of the front to be replaced by a 15’ sink tip.
JB



Adding back taper will decrease performance big time.

And the front of that line is fine enough you are going to have to take more than 15' off for it to cast any sink tip of significance...

That is one of the great dry lines on the market and hard to improve on


If i were you i would save that line and cut scraps of mediocre lines to make a dedicated tip line if you are really set on it.

You can take a light skagit or heavy scandi as a belly. Chop the fine crap off the front and then add a less severe taper to the front to extend the line a bit and get to your desired weight range

__________________
Swing the Fly Magazine
Jason Bates

Member
Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #9 
Zach, thanks for the details there. I am curious, when you say “decrease performance” I’m curios what specifically you mean? The thing is right now I have a few nice dry line options: a Delta, a Rio short head Spey (and a mid head spey on the way). My thinking on sacrificing the Aero was two fold: first off it does have a noticeable amount of power that I felt would be helpful in driving a sink tip, along with more substantial sized flies ( not huge monstrosities) for winter fishing, secondly, for dry line work I think I would prefer the Delta or the Rio mid head spey. For my tastes the Aero is impressive, but very much a “tweener” line compared to what I have currently.
Thanks again! JB

Poppy Cummins

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 739
Reply with quote  #10 
If you plan to use welding in your experiments here's a few things we've found. Welding usually doesn't work well on old line, dirty lines, or wet lines.
__________________
Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
Zack Williams

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 29
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Bates
Zach, thanks for the details there. I am curious, when you say “decrease performance” I’m curios what specifically you mean? The thing is right now I have a few nice dry line options: a Delta, a Rio short head Spey (and a mid head spey on the way). My thinking on sacrificing the Aero was two fold: first off it does have a noticeable amount of power that I felt would be helpful in driving a sink tip, along with more substantial sized flies ( not huge monstrosities) for winter fishing, secondly, for dry line work I think I would prefer the Delta or the Rio mid head spey. For my tastes the Aero is impressive, but very much a “tweener” line compared to what I have currently. Thanks again! JB


I would say whatever lines you prefer are most important but my opinion would be that the aero is ten times the dry line of those other ones so i would cut them and leave the aero for dedicated dry work.

back taper decreases the pull/jump you feel off the rod and slows your line speed down so it will likely not cast as far or easily if you add much of that. 

As for the mass in the back of the aero, it has a lot as you mention but that means there is very little up front to turn over a tip. So basically if you cut it back to a reasonable tip diameter for adding sink tips you will likely be left with a 25' skagit head that weighs about 400 grains...

A delta is a great sink tip line btw...cut 15' off that and throw a loop on it to fish tips...done.

__________________
Swing the Fly Magazine
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.