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Steven Maertens

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I heard the news last week that the Canadian Government has decided to push this project through. After talking with some Canadian steelhead fisherman, including Bob Clay up on the Kispiox, my understanding is that this could be a virtual death blow to the Skeena steelhead and salmon, the last significant wild run of steelhead in the western hemisphere! Does anyone have recent news on this? What is the sentiment of the Canadian people on this issue? What can and is being done to stop this?
Henry Carlile

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Are you sure it's a natural gas pipeline?  When I was last on the Skeena I heard that there already is a natural gas pipeline there.  But Enbridge was trying to push a tar-sands crude pipeline down the Skeena drainage.  According to the person I spoke with, there have already been breaks in the natural gas pipeline.  Tar sands crude is the dirtiest crude on the planet, and the fear is that since all the rivers in the Skeena drainage are fast-flowing a pipeline rupture would ruin most if not all of it.  It's a geologically unstable region prone to earthquakes.  I've signed petitions and donated money to Skeena Wild.  First Nations tribes were opposing the pipeline also.  I hope they haven't been bought out like most of the tribes were by the BPA on the Columbia when we were trying to rid the lower Snake of dams.  I think only the Nez Perce refused to sign the agreement.  We need to research this.
Henry Carlile

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Here: http://www.friendsofwildsalmon.ca/images/uploads/resources/NWI_SkeenaRiverDownstreamReport.pdf
Robert Broome

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Reply with quote  #4 
It is not the LNG pipe line it's self that is the killer here. It is the LNG compressor plant and shipping facility that is supposed to be built on the estuary grounds of the Skeena. Lealu Island is the rearing grounds for the entire Skeena system. The proposal is to build a new estuary grounds across the river. I do not think this can be done with success. The estuary has been naturally where it is for eons of time how can the currents the light cycle and the noise level necessary for success be duplicated. I don't think that it can. As far as how to stop it I am not sure what is going to happen. The first nations people from the area have vowed not to let this happen. They say it will be the end of their life style and their inherent right to fishing these traditional grounds. Be ready for a very rockus  period up here if the machinery starts to show up for work.
Rick Jorgensen

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seems oil pipelines near water are not necessarily a good thing!!!!!

http://www.sciencealert.com/that-thing-the-standing-rock-protesters-were-afraid-of-just-happened
Ralph Kroning

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Reply with quote  #6 
While this is an old thread it is still an important one and well worth a bit of an update.  The last time I looked there were at least 8 stand alone pipeline projects slated for the area, including natural gas, bitumen, and diluent pipelines. Some are proposed to run through the Kispiox area while others are proposed to go through the Bulkley/ Morrice area. The Morrice produces about 30% of the Skeena drainage  wild summer run steelhead  as well as about 30% of the Skeena wild chinook salmon escapement. These are not insignificant numbers.

As of 2016 the right of way on either side of Unist'ot'en lands has been cleared for the Coastal gaslink pipeline. The Unist'ot'en will not allow any pipeline across their unceded territory. The BC government is taking this seriously.

However, most of the proposed projects are on hold because of the current economic situation. This could change quickly though. The real threat here is not the simple fact that a so called natural gas pipeline ( there is a much smaller 8" gas line running through headwaters of the Copper which has been taken out numerous times by land slides over the years, note the proposed natural gas pipelines are a bit larger, ie around 40" diameter) is less damaging when it fails, compared to a bitumen pipeline but once a right of way corridor is established,  especially for a much easier to get through the regulatory system natural gas pipeline, it is considerably easier to get a bitumen pipeline or an accompanying diluent pipeline along the same corridor right of way. I wont get into the details of why this is a problem. Suffice it to say, any pipelines through the last stronghold of wild steelhead in north america is a bad idea and simply will be bad for the fish.

Here is a link to some detailed info on the proposed Coastal gas link pipeline: http://www.steelheadsociety.org/sites/default/files/January%2024%202013%20Gaslink%20submission.pdf
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