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John Driessen

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm picking up some new smith polar chromic sunglasses (love my insurance!) But I've heard mixed articles on which tint works best either green mirror, copper mirror, brown, or amber. Anyone fishing winter steelhead have an opinion or advice?
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justin carnecchia

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Reply with quote  #2 
They used to have (may still) a photochromatic copper, that I really liked. Worked great from pretty low light to all but the brightest days. Their low light ignitor seemed pretty good to but I've only seen them in the store, I haven't fished them.
Rick Jorgensen

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Reply with quote  #3 
googling smith found a couple of things - for freshwater seems they recommend ignitor or brown. I have always been a big fan of amber but alos do a fair amount of flats fishing and amber gives really good contrast

http://wwwdotsmithoptics.com/us/lensSelector

http://wwwdotsmithoptics.com/us/techsunglass
Dennis Kulhanek

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Reply with quote  #4 
It depends on the light condition. On the bright suny days over looking pool spoting fish any blue-gray tint works well. For wading in same condition I use copper tint and with fallig light I change to amber tint. All tints are photochromics. The polycarbonate glasses are cheeper, lighter and as good. Those are proven but There are some new interesting thints on the market. If you can try them on the river and return, you can come to some pleasant discovery.
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Jessea Grice

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Reply with quote  #5 
I had the Tenet copper mirror photochromic for a couple years and thought that they were the best lenses going. I replaced them with the Front Man ignitor chromapop photochromic and these are noticeably crisper. I highly recommend either lense but the chromapop option is really nice.
John Driessen

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks guys for all your replies!  I was hoping there was some science to throw at the problem and there definitely is.  I found a great article which suggested that blue light causes what we see to become washed out or a lack of contrast.  So a blue mirror over a gray or copper lens is the ticket.  But when you factor in the lower visual light transmission a blue mirror causes then everything becomes darker so great mid sunny day lenses but maybe not right for everything. 

Copper lenses have the greatest contrast and are recommended for the best all around.  However, adding a mirror lens reduces the VLT a bit but deflects more glare off the water.

Amber lenses are a bit brighter than copper lenses and great for morning, gray day, and evening fishing.  So I'm hoping if I throw a mirror on the amber the VLT will be somewhere near the copper lens.

So after all the lens nerdom I watched some YouTube videos of folks comparing $200 glasses to $5 polarized glasses which brought me into the seven level of sunglass lens hell as there wasn't a significant difference in being able to see into the water.  But I if there was one thing I learned it was that having different lenses for different occasions was the way to go.  I have a pair of Pepper's I picked up at the Sweet Grass Rod factory I paid $35 for and have been wearing them for the last five years and eventually had some polarized generic RX lenses thrown in.  I'll probably order an amber and blue mirror set of Pepper's and get some copper rx Smiths.

Also, I wrote Costa and they suggested green lens and copper base.  Smith suggested the ignitor lens.  So again, seventh level of lens hell.

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Mark Pascarella

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Reply with quote  #7 
Been using brown lenses for over 30 years, to me they seem to work under nearly any condition. 

Michael Oliver

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Reply with quote  #8 
copper photochromic

The photochromic really help in early morning and evening to help in low light conditions.
As far as cheap vs expensive I have 40$ pairs I like and 200$ pairs that I love.

Glass lenses are always crisper and clearer IMO and ussually cost more
( i think there is a saying about that).

I place polirized lense eye protection as one of my most important pieces of fly fishing equipment so spending a few bucks is worth it. 



Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #9 
I like Amber or Copper[cool]
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Speyed trout guide on the upper Columbia
Wayne Dreger

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Reply with quote  #10 
Was told that glass is not polarized, Polaroid glass, glasses are made by sandwiching a polarized film between two glass lenses. Thus the cost and clarity.
Geoff garland

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Reply with quote  #11 
For years I have gone with amber in the dull and dark copper in the bright.
Either that's the right combination or I have just gotten used to those lense colour choices and anything else on river water seems off to me.
Kinda like eating Chinese food with a fork when you are used to chopsticks.
Matthew LeBret

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Reply with quote  #12 
I'm a little late to the party but I'm a huge fan of polarized copper or bronze lenses. I like Oakley's but that's just a preference thing.
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