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Tim Rawlins

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Reply with quote  #1 
Thumbing through Lani Waller the other day and came across the statement made by a guide in answer to Lani's question "What one thing do all good fishermen have in common?"  The guides answer..."They lose a lot of flies".  I'm paraphrasing.  

This must include nymphing techniques etc.  I rarely loose flies when I swing them.  As a matter of fact that is a huge part of the reason I quit fishing hardware. So am I doing something wrong?  Not that I would change a thing.  I'm perfectly happy but like to hear others opinions.


fredaevans

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Reply with quote  #2 
Known what you mean. If I loose a half dozen flies over the course of a year ... half of them have ended up in a tree somewhere.
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Tim Rawlins

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredaevans
Known what you mean. If I loose a half dozen flies over the course of a year ... half of them have ended up in a tree somewhere.


Haha! Your answer made me laugh Fred.  True story buddy. Thanks!
Wayne Dreger

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Reply with quote  #4 
Fishing winter steel or late summer fish I can lose 1/2 dozen in one run. Hard to make fish move in cold water. Keep it deep and in their face.
Zack Williams

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Reply with quote  #5 
loosing flies on the bottom means you are not in touch with how your fly is fishing...
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Wayne Dreger

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Reply with quote  #6 
If you are attempting to fish close to the bottom, how do you know how and where your fly is fishing if you don't have contact with the bottom once in a while? Some of the rivers I fish are not that forgiving. The saying in my neck of the woods is "if your not losing flies, your not fishing".

While I don't nymph or use an indicator, I do fish very heavy sink tips on the swing. Does that make me one of the non elite?

Your comment suggests a lack of fishing knowledge or ability. At 70 years of age, 65 years of fishing,35 as a professional guide I beg to differ.

If you ever come to Skeena country or Vancouver Island, I suggest you bring several dozen flies.

JonathanHicks

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Reply with quote  #7 
Whether an angler loses flies on the bottom is a function of the topography of the river bed more than the pure depth of the fly.

If you are fishing in 5 ft of water & getting down, but are on a clean gravel bed, you won't loose many flies. However, if you are fishing over a row of large boulders ( which create lies for the fish) or where there are 'fingers' of exposed bedrock, particularly something hard like granite, which stick up to within 2 feet of the surface then you will inevitably loose some flies - if you don't then you aren't as deep as you think you are.

This is where tubes or intruder patterns score as often you will recover the fly but the hook is ruined, & in the case of these it's easy to replace it.

Some rivers are fly eaters, others are much less greedy.

Regards, Jon.
Zack Williams

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Dreger
If you are attempting to fish close to the bottom, how do you know how and where your fly is fishing if you don't have contact with the bottom once in a while? Some of the rivers I fish are not that forgiving. The saying in my neck of the woods is "if your not losing flies, your not fishing".

While I don't nymph or use an indicator, I do fish very heavy sink tips on the swing. Does that make me one of the non elite?

Your comment suggests a lack of fishing knowledge or ability. At 70 years of age, 65 years of fishing,35 as a professional guide I beg to differ.

If you ever come to Skeena country or Vancouver Island, I suggest you bring several dozen flies.



lol

i will add the word "constantly" to my statement. constantly losing flies means you are not in contact with how your fly is fishing. if i lose a fly...i made a mistake. either my cast didnt turn over, i gave it too much sink time, or i have too heavy a tip on. 

there are exceptions to every rule of course, like once in a blue moon there is a stick up that is completely unseen. otherwise....a mistake was made.

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Wayne Dreger

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Reply with quote  #9 
 I can make the statement "according to the guide Lani was talking to"
that I am a good fisherman, as I lose a lot of flies. You on the other hand don't lose them unless you made a mistake. What kind of fisherman does that make you?

Losing a fly or two finding out where the holes are or where the rocks are is important when fishing. That is where the fish hold. Fishing tail outs over gravel bottoms is not always where the fish are. Learning the runs is what it takes to be successful.


Bruce Kruk

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Reply with quote  #10 
after 65 years of fishing you would think you would know where you would lose your fly and maybe adjust not to lol
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Zack Williams

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Reply with quote  #11 
Wayne,

You seem to be making this into a who's a better fisherman argument, which was never my intent nor do I feel the need to debate this.

My intent was to provide another perspective to the original question and for which I stand by my original statement.

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Darryl Rigets

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Reply with quote  #12 
Really, what does it matter?

I lose a fly now and then but I fish familiar water. I do lose less flies spey casting than single hand. I fish mostly dry line and scandi, if I fished more sink tip I would likely lose more flies.

I really don't think the number of flies lost determines the caliber of fisherman.

Peace to all and to all a good night :[wink]

Oh yes and a happy new year!!!!

Cheers

Darryl
Paul Metcalf

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Reply with quote  #13 
Yup.  And since losing flies doesn't make me a better fisherman, I'd just assume not lose flies.  Pain in the backside retying all the time.
Mark Nickerson

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Reply with quote  #14 
Whether I should be hanging up or not, I do tend to do so occasionally. What I've learned how to do is get my fly loose with minimal damage. Throwing a huge downstream mend below the fly seems to work quite often when hung up on rocks, though not so much with wood. On Haida Gwaii I will get stuck in the trees periodically. I don't think you can fish some of those rivers successfully without living near the trees. When that happens I never pull on  the fly but give it aggressive up and down shakes rapidly and I am often pleasantly surprised at the result. One buddy calls it the Miley Cyrus Shake.

Learning how to retrieve stuck flies became necessary when using elaborate flies that take a while to tie. When a single-hander I'd often get impatient and just yank away -- flies were simpler and cheaper. Oh, and tippet wasn't quite as strong with a trout rod either.
Poppy Cummins

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Reply with quote  #15 
Just maybe when replying on threads of this type one should state the fishing location and tackle used. As is common on the internet the above answers are apples and oranges depending on where one fishes and the tackle one uses.

There are some people fishing for chrome year around with a floating line that will very seldom lose a fly in the water. It all just depends on where one is fishing and how they're fishing. 

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Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
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