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Serge Mrkobrada

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Reply with quote  #1 

Hello, 

Just wondering if anyone has had experience with these lines. They seem to cover all depths from floating to deep. Are they meant to be used with a sink tip? How do the heavier heads cast?

Thanks, I realize that they are probably not that popular on this side of the pond. 

Cheers, 

SM

Jan Sorensen

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Reply with quote  #2 
I have a Loop Scandi kit. It came with a floating tip and two sink tips. All the tips cast the same and since the tips already sink all you need is a mono leader
Serge Mrkobrada

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Jan, 

The Guideline heads do not come with tips, but have integrated 3 density sections at the end of the line..I think you are right, a mono leader would work...Ill try it out.

Thanks,
SM
JonathanHicks

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Reply with quote  #4 
I use these lines a lot here in the UK & have them in a wide variety of weights and sinking rates.

They are designed to turn over poly-tips or equivalent, but not heavy Mow tips etc. as the heads them selves are intended to acheive the depth band required with the polytips to aid presentation & fine tuning of the depth. that said I often use a 6 ft length of T14 on the end of an #11/12 rated sink 1/3/5 head to assist in getting the fly sub-surface & fishing in fast water on the lower Tay to avoid it sliding & missing the first couple of yards of the swing; the big heads like this have no problem whatsoever in picking this up & turning it [& a brass tube fly] over.

For fishing up in the water column, but with a bit more control than a floater would give, the Float/Hover/Intermediate is a lovely line - you can add anything from a 5 ft slow sink polytip to a 10 ft super-extra fast one to vary the depth from say 6"-8" to 2' 6" & benefit from a slightly slower swing than with the full floater + a straighter line to the fly.

The Float/Sink 2/ Sink 4 is a big favourite of mine, it will get you down on many of the stretches I fish in spring & Autumn, but the floating rear third limits the depth it reaches & makes it much easier to bring back to the surface to re-cast than a fully sunk head. If you change from this to an Intermediate/ Sink2/ Sink 4 [which is only a small change of the rear third] you definately fish deeper & get a slightly slower swing but have to be more positive when bringing the line up for the next cast. The fast ones line the sink 3/5/7 are absolute depth charges, where I fish I'd spend all day snagged if I fished these.

There are plenty of other combinations, I regularly use a Float/ Intermediate/ Sink 2 & a Hover/Sink 1/Sink 3 and they are all good - you just need to pick the suitable ones for your needs - but you don't need them all as you can fine tune with polytips or lengths of T material to bridge between lines.

I prefer the older uncut ones to trim to length as I can match them to my rod & my casting, others prefer the pre-cut & pre-looped ones; but either way I recomend them.

Regards, Tyke.
Serge Mrkobrada

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you Tyke for your detailed and informative response....I picked up a 8/9 Float/ Intermediate/ Sink 2 and Hover/Sink 1/Sink 3 of the older 3D uncut heads on eBay for I believe was half price, and I am looking forward to trying them out for some sink tip work with my Meiser MKS 7/8. After reading your response, I may also consider the Float/Hover/Intermediate, which seems perfect for fall steel heading. 

Regarding cutting the lines, is it matter of trial and error, making small changes until you feel it is "dialed in"?

I also looked at the Rio Scandi 3D heads, but the Guideline ones seemed more comprehensive in terms of the choices of sink rates available. 

Thanks for all your help, 
Cheers from Canada
Serge
JonathanHicks

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Serge,

Hold off on the cutting until you've tried them at full length first - I prefer the full length 9/10 head on my 14 ft NRX & just add a loop to the rear, so try the full head first. Also if you normally use a compact head then the rod will need more weight for a longer head to achieve a similar feel & loading.

Remember it's easy to cut but very difficult to add back afterwards, so if you need to cut do it in small amounts & re try; just use a braided loop & sleeve, or whip it in place with tying thread, until you get it how you like it & then make a permanent job of the loop.

Remember also that they are polyurethane not PVC so if you are intending to make welded loops use the correct material & methods; I don't bother as I simply make double walled braided loops from 50 lbs test braided nylon & whip these in place coating the whipping & braid in Aquasure - this works well & is very strong.

Best wishes, Jon.
AJ Morris

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Reply with quote  #7 
I don't know how germane this is to your Guideline lines, but a friend of mine recently purchased the Rio version of these lines, and I was casting 'em a little bit the other day. It was difficult to really evaluate since I wasn't at all familiar with his rod, but:

I did find that a really slow lift was super important. There is a lot of mass and a lot of stick, so getting all the tension out of the rod before starting the sweep was critical. 

In slower water, I generally had to roll the line up to the surface. I found that stopping the rod in the lifted position and immediately going into the sweep worked better than letting the line settle.

The way they absolutely hammered through the wind was impressive. High density/small diameter lines with tight loops and excellent line speed.

The disparity in mass between the 30# mono running line he likes [tounge2] and the head made it more than a little clunky to cast with a single-spey. If it were up to me I would definitely use a heavier, coated running line. 

My friend is primarily a skagit guy, so he was sticking to the sustained-anchor/continuous-load casts he normally uses, and they worked admirably.

Anyway, my $.02

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Serge Mrkobrada

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks for the reply AJ....

The Rio lines are a bit shorter as the Guideline heads come in at 44 (vs 34 feet), but as Jon mentioned they are meant to be cut to individual preferences. I found a you tube video of Frodin using one of the heads with a single spey - its pretty impressive the way he casts and fishes that line....



See circa 1 min 40 seconds...




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