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Leo Moore

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Reply with quote  #1 
I know it's a two handed forum but there is lots of experience here. First let me say I have never handled a trout sized click and pawl reel. Is there any preference for either disc drag or click and pawl reels for single handed trout sized rods? I'm not talking about stopping power but about more inertia needed to start a click and pawl reel and the possibility of breaking off a tippet, or is this even an issue? Thought I read something about this one time. Thanks for any comments.

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Poppy Cummins

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Reply with quote  #2 
First this is not a two hand rod forum. This place is about spey casting which can be done with a single hander as well as anything. Spey Casting is about a type of cast not rods.

It's a non issue Leo. Any decent click and pawl reel will work just fine on a trout stick. The Abel Creeks and Abel TR, plus the Hardy Lightweight series are my favorites .

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Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
DaveEvans

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Reply with quote  #3 
Others more experienced can chime in, but when fishing for trout I rarely have the line tight to the reel when I first hook a fish, except maybe when fishing soft hackles.  I think the tip action might be more important to protect tippets than the reel at that point as I set the hook.  I cannot think of any reels that have caused me big problems with tippet once I get them on the reel as long as I have the reel set light enough, but I have a love affair with Abels and they have very nice drags on the Super Series.  I would get the Abel TR for a 4 wt or below.
Gene Larson

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Reply with quote  #4 
In the realm of trout, the reel is a line storage device.  In 40+ years of trout fishing, I've never regretted not having a drag to help me land a fish.  Right now, I have mostly Hardy reels and one Orvis Battenkill, all C & P.  I've fished the Abel TR series and they are very nice as well, just a little too heavy for my taste.  
Joe Congleton

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Reply with quote  #5 
Poppy has given you the accurate short answer: click and pawl on about any reel will  not break the tippet in 99.9% of the hookups. Longer answer: big fish are a whole different ball game. Bear with me….

Gene, i beg to differ- politely- some about the value of drag in a reel...your method of controlling line slippage or tension through your hands is a skill set that helps.  But IMO Learning how to use that hand control  in conjunction with a very fine drag system in a reel can certainly better equip me to deal with large fish on light tippets. Heck, its pretty critical on large fish on a spey rod as well IMO.

In addition to chasing steel for decades i have done  an extensive amount of fine tippet trout fishing.  Spring creek type stuff.  Mainly 6x but occasionally 7x and typically small dry flies 18-20 type sizes.  Hunting big trout with tiny flies. Tailwaters and clear spring creeks all over the continent.  Because i do not live in steelhead country i fish a lot more for trout than i do for steel.   I have landed some huge fish on this trout stuff, and personally i know many would not have been brought to the hand /net without an exceptional reel drag system , and learning how to get the line reel connection under some sort of control in the first seconds of a large fish/small tippet fight.   if you are seeking very large fish on very fine tippets (or big steelhead or sea run browns on your spey rod) then the point in time when the line begins to leave the reel ("start up inertia") is very very critical in the fight to land a large fish on very light tippet. As you raise up/side slip  the rod to set  the hook  a large fish will typically bolt with great strength and some for great distance; at first one typically slides the line through your fingers of the hand that is not on the rod(some through the  index finger of top finger on the rod), and the initial reel- line -rotation stage (start up inertia) is the critical point which l think the original question addressed.  lt is at this point where you are trying to get the loose  line in your hands past the  stage of line slipping through your hands under some tension (to protect tippet as well as keep the line out from under your feet or tangled) to the stage at which the line is tight to the stored line/backing  on  the reel. The fish  fight thereafter is done in some manner with the line/ or backing  running directly from the reel.  Some try to control this by using a non-drag reel and sliding the line through their fingers from the reel, using finger pressure (Gene, this you , right?).  Others like Dave Evans rely on the properly set drag tension on a fine reel to be a second asset to  control the fight as best they can.  In truth l probably use both methods in every large fish tussle, using some finger tension but ALWAYS prepared let the reel drag be the primary asset in dealing with a fish run that takes whole fly line and gets me in to the backing --that is the point where l raise the rod to keep as much fly line off the water (line drag equals tippet pressure)  as possible and simply let the reel drag handle the tussle for the moment.  This is not just single hander stuff though; the discussion here is equally applicable to a spey rod or a saltwater fight that deals with powerful fish. Should also say that almost all my fishing is wading , not boat fishing.  It is IMO much much easier to deal with a large fish from a boat (assuming someone else is rowing) than it is when wading.

So whats the point of this --a click and pawl leaves you only one asset;  line control through your fingers.  A great drag system gives you a second asset- when an explosive run screams line from the reel and any  finger tension is a dangerous undertaking. BUT you have to have a absolutely reliable and properly set drag and you have to get a sense of when to let the drag be the asset, and not your fingers.  I have lost some really big fish because of poor drag setting, poor line handling prior to getting the fish on a reel, poor line control even after the line is on the reel and drag is properly set, and about every other way you can imagine. 

I have used abel pt 5 reels for decades for trout; Ross G-3 and G-4 for bonefish/permit; and now use a Tibor for my spey rods.  I am constantly mindful of the drag tension setting on the reel on any fishing day and periodically through the fishing day hand pull to check tension to be prepared for the fish of a lifetime. Of course i could just use calf rope for tippet  and not have so many concerns , right?[biggrin]

Gene Larson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Joe, you make good points, and I would agree with them.  I forget who said it, I remember reading "I would never relegate playing the fish to an unthinking spring."  The author was referring the then common use of "...automatic" fly reels that retrieved the line when you depressed a lever with your little finger.  In fishing, as well as the rest of life, its what floats your boat that makes it enjoyable.  
Joe Congleton

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Reply with quote  #7 
Gene--interesting quote:"I would never relegate playing the fish to an unthinking spring."

My first fly reel in the early fifties was one of those two pound automatic retrieve jobs. Today I wouldn't trust it much either .    I do however think most of the drag systems in great reels today are far more than "unthinking".  in the heat of the battle 
that spring or tension control on the cork drag or whatever has been so carefully engineered may be a lot more calm and collected than l am as far as knowing how much line tension-pressure should be put on  a fish when the fish departs at high speed……..  .
DaveEvans

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Reply with quote  #8 
I do not think it is either - or with a disk drag.  I still palm a disk drag reel when fighting a fish, but I agree with Joe that a reel with a great drag is an asset.  But I also enjoy my click and pawl reels.  
Poppy Cummins

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Reply with quote  #9 
Depends on the species of fish. I have caught many hundreds of fish on a good old Perrine auto plus a few other brands with no issues that were not of my own doing. Would I use one for chasing chrome or the salt, no but for bluegills, bass bugging and a lot trout creek fishing those auto reels work very well and they don't seem all that heavy when hanging on a 9 foot cane rod.
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Poppy=Red Shed Spey Rod Pimp http://www.redshedflyshop.com FRSCA-Founding Member How you get the line out and fishing is personal preference so as long as it works and is easy no one should care but the caster. MSB
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